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Another study links coffee to a longer life

Does coffee help you live longer? 

We've all seen the headlines lately about the hundreds of studies emerging about coffee — whether or not it's good for you, how it can help with heart health, and the optimal amount and time to drink it

Another major theme has linked coffee to living a longer life. One study concluded that moderate amounts of coffee and wine are linked to living a longer life, while another links coffee to anti-aging properties. Another recent study about coffee comes from our friends across the pond — and yes, it concludes that drinking up to 8 cups of coffee a day can help you live longer. 

In a study of around half a million British adults, coffee drinkers were found to have a slightly lower risk of death over a 10-year follow up period than non-coffee drinkers. The study is also the first of its kind to suggest health benefits in people with "genetic glitches" affecting how their bodies respond to caffeine

This study comes from the National Cancer Institute and used data from people taking part in a genetic study called the United Kingdom Biobank. Participants were asked to donate blood and answer detailed questions about health and lifestyle. 

During the length of the study, which spanned about a decade, researchers found that coffee drinkers were 10 to 15 percent less likely to die than non-coffee drinkers.

Coffee is packed with antioxidants and other compounds that help with memory, heart health, exercise performance, and more (when you leave the extra additives out). But it's still extremely important to note that a healthy lifestyle is important for a long, healthy life. If you have heart problems or other medical problems, it's best to consult your doctor before starting to drink coffee or upping how often you do. 

But still, you can put this in the book as another reason as to why coffee is basically magic.

Related: Coffee can extend heart health, according to the American Heart Association

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