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Fueled By death cast



Fueled By Death Cast Ep. 167 - Kyle Sanders HELLYEAH

KYLE SANDERS - HELLYEAH

"So you have to do whatever you have to do to make ends meet so you can do what you want to do that makes you happy." Kyle Sanders, bass player, HELLYEAH

 

 

CHECK OUT THIS EXCLUSIVE PREVIEW

ABOUT KYLE SANDERS:

Kyle Sanders plays the bass with intense passion, and it shows. Joining the band HELLYEAH in 2013, Kyle started playing at an early age and influenced his younger brother Troy (Mastadon) to pick up the instrument as well. We talk about his time with Bloodsimple, what's next for HELLYEAH after the untimely death of drummer Vinnie Paul, and how Kyle is giving back to the next generation of musicians with the Let There Be Rock School.

TRANSCRIPT:

Jeff:
Kyle, I'd love to start by talking about what you just did, which is something I've been wanting to go on for awhile because it seems like it is incredibly fun, which is the ShipRocked rock cruise and Hellyeah just did it.

Kyle:
That's awesome.

Jeff:
Yeah, it was awesome. Can you talk a little bit about that experience? Was this your first time doing it or have you guys done it before?

Kyle:
No, it's actually Hellyeah's third cruise or third ShipRocked. and then I went on the mega cruise and just got invited to go, so I went as like a fan and not, you know. I ended up playing a little bit like at this All Star Jam, but-

Jeff:
Of course.

Kyle:
Yeah. Which as far as ShipRocked goes, that was Hellyeah's third appearance and it's awesome, man. It's like five days and you play twice or we played twice once on the way out and at once on the way back and then this time it stopped in Key West and Cozumel. And it's always one or two different stops. And yeah, I mean, it's a cool vibe too because everybody on the boat is fans. And bands and fans are all just on the same boat. So you see each other all the time and people are real respectful too. It's not overwhelming like somehow at a show, at a venue, people are kind of rude sometimes. They're just like invading your privacy. But on boats, everyone's on the same, literally same boat. And so you're just kind of together and watching bands together and seeing your favorite bands and hanging out. So being our third time, yes, we do like it or we wouldn't keep going back.

Jeff:
That's amazing. That's amazing. And I got to do this very recently, a couple of years ago, we at Death Wish Coffee got invited on the Flogging Molly cruise.

Kyle:
Oh, I've heard about that, yeah.

Jeff:
Yeah, their punk rock cruise. And it seems to be like this thing now. Like let's get a bunch of bands and go out into international waters and see what the fuck's going to happen, right?

Kyle:
Exactly. It's all the kids. The wrestling cruise, there's country cruises. I think there's a Monster The Rock cruise going on that's like some hair metal bands and then like a Yes and Moody Blues. Like genres. And they seem to all do very well because it's not cheap to charter a boat, you know? So obviously like promoters keep doing it and it's successful every time. This boat was sold out and like ShipRocked sells out. Like the next day, it sells out for next year. Like people just go, they don't care what the lineup is. I think you have the opportunity to back out if you don't like the lineup or whatever. You put a deposit down for next year, like the day you got off the boat or maybe the day that you got home or something. But it's crazy.

Jeff:
That's crazy. That's cool. And what's great about a band like Hellyeah, you guys really are awesome with your fans and I think that's got to be such a cool experience to be, for lack of a better term, stuck on a boat in the middle of the ocean with a bunch of awesome fans. Right?

Kyle:
It is. That's exactly how it is. And like I said, our fans are awesome and they're just totally respectful. You know, like they just hang out with you like a friend would hang out. It's not bombarding you and just bugging you and just being inconsiderate of you. Yeah, our fans are the best. I mean, if it wasn't for our fans, we wouldn't have been able to come back and do everything that we're doing right now. We give all the credit to them for welcoming us back on stage with everything we went through. Our fans are a big, big deal to us.

Jeff:
That's awesome. That's awesome. And speaking on Hellyeah, love this band for a very long time. You actually joined the band in 2014, I'm correct-

Kyle:
Well yeah. It's like the end of '13 right before Blood For Blood came out. So yeah, really 2014 is when it officially got going.

Jeff:
So I know kind of the story, but like did you know the guys prior? Were you a fan of the band prior? Was that kind of a thing or?

Kyle:
It totally was because I have a history first with Chad because of my previous band or a couple of previous bands, a band called Bloodsimple. Chad, from when his Mudvayne was ... He saw the band, loved the band. It's like I want to start a label and sign this band. So he signed us and then we got a deal through him and that landed on Warner Brothers. And then we did a couple Mudvayne tours. And then I actually did the first Hellyeah tour, like when Vinnie got back on stage after everything he went through in the past.

Kyle:
So my band, Bloodsimple did the first Hellyeah tour and they did a couple other Hellyeah tours. So I got to know all those guys. And then even after that, I had a band out of Atlanta called MonstrO and Hellyeah took MonstrO out. So I did another tour with them. So by the time, you know, just know those guys really well and all got along really well like brothers and by the time ... There was just the timing was right. It was just a phone call saying "All right, it's happening now. You want in?" I said yes. So it was just a click and it was done.

Jeff:
That's awesome. You've always been such a hard working musician. In fact, honestly the first time I heard of you was with Bloodsimple. I was a Mudvayne fan. Actually saw you guys open for them on tour and like you mentioned with MonstrO and all the projects that you've been in and now coalescing with Hellyeah and it's just amazing. What a ride. It is it different being in a project like Bloodsimple or MonstrO where you're doing a little bit of a different thing as opposed to what you're doing with Hellyeah or is it kind of like the same thing?

Kyle:
You mean, like work ethic wise or musically wise?

Jeff:
Both actually.

Kyle:
Both. I mean, because like early on, like in the Bloodsimple days we were making ends meet, but I was tour managing and then another dude was driving and I bought the RV and then ... Everything is in house. You can hire like one crew guy to come out with you who does almost everything. So you're doing a lot more work like off the stage then as much as being Hellyeah. And then, being on a bus and having a full crew and being almost spoiled and having so many people working with us and working together. But it's what it takes. You have to do whatever ... Even like when MonstrO came along, it's after Bloodsimple ended and I was like starting over is the last thing I want to do, but what's the option? It's either starting over or nothing, and hope you get lucky and get a phone call or get an audition or something.

Kyle:
So I picked up the pieces and started over and did that again and did the whole same thing. The RV and print our own merge and so on. And so, yeah, it's just a big step up and it's kind of really satisfying, It just shows that persistence and hard work and not quitting it's going to pay off. It's all different levels of how you consider what a pay off is. But I don't look at it financially. I look at it like I'm still moving forward and moving in the right direction and believe in what we're doing and we'll continue to throughout until I just can't play anymore. You don't just stop playing if that's what's in your blood and that's what makes you happy.

Jeff:
Excellent. That's super inspiring. And that actually makes me want to take it all the way back because like where was the moment in your life where you picked up the instrument? Were you really young?

Kyle:
I actually wasn't really young, compared to how young you see kids on YouTube, just [inaudible 00:07:05] years old, which I still don't even understand. But I was still older I think than a lot of people. I was like 13 or 14 when I started. Like I always loved music and would just air guitar and air drum and finally decided I should get an instrument and figure how to play it. So I feel I was a little bit later in life rather than being younger. But it was about 13 or 14.

Kyle:
And actually when I first saw ... I just watched it again the other day. It was on video or something, but it was Cliff Burton, Day On The Green with Metallica playing that outdoor festival that you see clips all the time and like Clipper and Clip is there. Like after when I saw that, that's where it just clicked. I don't know what it was. I was like that's exactly who I want to be like and that's what I want to do with the rest of my life. So that was really the beginning.

Jeff:
That is an incredible influence to have. Cliff's one of the all time greats for sure.

Kyle:
Just so amazing and yeah, he was so young too. I'm just looking at what he did in his short lifespan really makes you want to work harder. So looking at how huge of an influence of just an amazing player that even in person he was and dying that young too, you know? So it's just another thing about just never quitting because you never know.

Jeff:
Yeah, exactly. Did you grow up in like a musical household? I mean, you know, for our listeners and viewers who might not know, I mean, you have a musical brother as well, Troy, and I mean like, were you guys like ... Was there music all the time as you guys were growing up?

Kyle:
Well, I'm the oldest and I have two younger brothers. Troy's in the middle who's in Mastodon. And then Darren, the youngest brother who's like rock star tech. He's out with Slipknot for their whole duration right now. And he does Mastodon a lot. He's been with Hellyeah, everybody. He just always working, you know, so.

Jeff:
That's awesome.

Kyle:
It just started with me liking like Motley Crue and Kiss early on so that's where the music started. My mom played French horn and piano, but it wasn't nonstop in the house music. It didn't really get started until I started buying records and then Troy listened to The Walls and hear me practice on my bass. And then when I'd leave, he'd sneak in my room and pick up my bass and play, which is why we both play bass. If we were smart we would have played different instruments. So we could've just-

Jeff:
Started a band?

Kyle:
A lot of people that stick together and play. So we did not think about that at the time.

Jeff:
That's funny. That's funny. So when did it coalescence? Like you said you started around 13-14, you started picking up that instrument really going. And obviously Cliff was a big influence, but when did it start to be like I'm going to pursue this, I want to actually try and see if I can make it as a musician. Was that right from the get go?

Kyle:
It wasn't from the get go because all I cared about was learning. Like it was Cliff Burton, Steve Harris, Geezer Butler, like all the finger players. So I was just learning, putting on their records and listening, you know, learning it by ear. Like all I cared about was playing covers, like write my own music didn't interest me. I was like I don't want to do that. I don't know why. It's just how I thought.

Kyle:
And it wasn't until at the end of high school is when I moved out of the house and got a warehouse downtown and got some other dudes to jam with and really started to write our own music. We started playing covers and then we started thrown in original and thrown in a couple more. And then it's like well, we see all these other huge bands in the '80s and '90s getting record deals. Let's, let's get a record deal. Of course it's not that easy, but we got our first deal and then that was just the beginning of it. That was like '92, '93 was our first actual record deal. Crazy, yep.

Jeff:
Yeah, that's amazing.

Kyle:
So we got that and started doing a little bit of like small tourings. I live in Georgia, so it's regional, in Southeast and then some up the East Coast. But it just kind of grew from there. Like that band went to the next band and I got a little bit bigger and learned a little bit more and write more music and recording and just keeping your face out there and just doing it. You know, working.

Jeff:
That's so amazing. That's so amazing. And like you've just been going at it ever since, never looking back. And that's what's really inspiring about it too. Because like you said, like just if you want it, go for it.

Kyle:
Right, exactly.

Jeff:
What would you say is your favorite part? Do you love the touring? Do you love the recording? Do you love the writing? Like what is your favorite part of being a musician?

Kyle:
A fair part has always been playing live. Always has been, it's like the only true release that I have, so I can just be a normal person the rest of the time. And you can just let everything out and just go ballistic on stage. And I still to this day that's still the most rewarding part. The studio is awesome. Hearing ideas come to life and it's a lot of fun, but playing live is and always has been the best part for me. But touring constantly, I am at the point where I don't want to tour 10 months out of the anymore. I do want a tour, I do want to go out, but I don't want to go out for an eight week tour and then come home for a week and go back out because I have a lot of other things going on in my life. I opened up a school at home and the music schools. There's a lot going on. But as far as touring isn't like a priority. I still want to, but it's not all I want to do. Now there's other things I want to do, still within music but just different.

Jeff:
Yeah, and let's talk about that. I think it's so incredible that you are connected with this rock school now and like can we talk about like how this even came to be? Because it's just an amazing. It's an amazing thing.

Kyle:
Yeah. And that's another huge like satisfying inspirational thing that I'm glad that I did. It's called Let There Be Rock school. It's in Gainesville, Georgia. It's about an hour North of Atlanta. And I actually started thinking about doing something like this a few years ago. It was like that'd be awesome to do in my off time. But like I said, my off time was very limited, so I can't just start a business being home for two weeks at a time or even a month at a time. So it was just something that I thought about a lot. It was like one day maybe I'll do that.

Kyle:
And then, it all really came to fruition when Betty passed, like that was just probably the worst. I mean, the worst time of my life ever. Like the worst loss. It was this awful ... So I could've gone two directions. It could have gone down a dark hole and just ruined everything or was like I got to do something positive and something to focus on that's going to just keep me in the right direction.

Kyle:
So that's when the light went off. It's like now's the time. Like I got to open a school now because I don't know what's going to happen with the band. I don't know what's going to happen with everybody in the band. There was too many unknowns and just too much just sadness going on and depression. Like I got to get out of this and do something for the better and just kind of give back and still keep focused and still be in music and playing. But just kind of bringing up the new generation and learn from my mistakes. As I was saying how they're starting at six and seven, eight years old and they're in the school starting at that young. It's was like I can teach you so much to look out for that you're going to be a pro by the time I started playing. You're already going to know what not to do and the red flags to look for and all this kind of stuff.

Kyle:
And it's going up ... Actually I'm coming up on one year, St. Patrick's Day for the school, so it's awesome. I got some planned events for that. We'll be home and figure out what we're going to do for all that.

Jeff:
That's amazing. How many students are a part of the school?

Kyle:
It's over 50 now.

Jeff:
Wow.

Kyle:
I have an adult program too because it's all kind of adults. It's like, I used to play guitar, but blah blah. I was like well, start playing again. They're like yeah, I should start playing. So they're literally from six to 66 right now. It's officially the youngest to the oldest. And it's awesome. There's like parents of the kids that are coming in like well, I'm here while he's taking his lesson, I should pick it back up again. And then we're forming bands, so. There's a lot of like between eight and 15 year old bands, but I'm waiting to start that first. It's like more of an adult band and then do some bar shows around town, just have a lot of fun like we all started out doing, you know, doing it just for the fun aspect of it all.

Jeff:
That's amazing.

Kyle:
It's awesome. Yeah, it's fun. I'm here, like I just came to school right now. Usually I'm here every day, all day when I'm not on tour because running this place and keeping it going. And so yes, I'm just constantly busy with it.

Jeff:
That's so cool. So you said about 50 students. How many teachers do you have?

Kyle:
I have six instructors right now.

Jeff:
Wow.

Kyle:
So I teach some base and kind of dabble going in the rooms and do like band director on some. I'm just kind of like overseeing everything. But I do teach also. But yeah, there's six, a couple vocal instructors and then a couple guys that can do everything. So it's guitar, bass, keyboards, drums, vocals right now.

Jeff:
That is so amazing. The amount of band potential that you have is-

Kyle:
Oh, I can't wait. We already have four bands and one of them is like eight to 10 year olds and the others are like early teenagers. And I can tell them, man, they're already good. I just can't wait for another year down the road to see how just bad ass they're going to be. And to see a younger band like that and we're doing shows around town, it's really cool for them and for us and for the parents and all the friends and community to see a band just kicking ass being that young.

Jeff:
That's so rad and it's so inspiring just from someone outside seeing it. But probably in your position too, it must be really inspiring to be able to be in this and see that kind of [crosstalk 00:16:23]-

Kyle:
I kind of created this place to what a place I wish I had when I was that young because basically my school was just an extension of my bedroom when I was a teenager. It was just full of posters and memorabilia and just gear in every room and just fill it up. When people walk in the door, they're like "Oh yeah. This is awesome. I love this place." And lot of people just hang out because it's more like a rock and roll community center too because they just hang around and meet people and then start jamming and just watching things happen naturally, you know, how it's supposed to be.

Jeff:
That's awesome. And it's got to be rough on the business side of it, keeping the schools going with the year and everything. Is there any way for our listeners and viewers to help out, to donate or to help your school?

Kyle:
It's awesome because I haven't really reached out and asked for that. But people have definitely ... Like if they're not in state or in the area, they'll ask how can they help? And some have donated money. Like I want to sponsor a kid for a month or here's like X amount of money for someone for lessons. And then there's plenty of instrument donations. I mean, we're going through, like especially like drum heads and strings and cables, that stuff, a little wear and tear this place is getting.

Kyle:
So everything helps and everything I get is just put to use. That's say other thing, there's a lot of kids who I know deserve to be in here and I know they flat out can't afford it. Like I know the families just can't do it. So that's where it's even more special to where I have like a separate fund to where not that I'm being taken advantage of saying I'm giving scholarship. I just know when they come in and I can see that they have the potential and the drive and the hunger to play. But I know that they just can't afford the monthly lessons, that's what that kind of money comes from. And I'll just take care of you until you guys can get on your feet and you can pay whatever.

Kyle:
So it kind of varies. But I definitely work with people and people know that. So they ask how they can help out and they've done for everything, like I said, from instruments to mic stands to cash, all kinds of things. So it's awesome how people really care about music and trying to keep it in this school. At least it's not in schools a lot anymore. But that's why I've created just a school just for music.

Jeff:
That's so rad. Well, I'll put links to it all in here. What's the website link for the school?

Kyle:
Yeah, I mean, it's Let There Be Rock Georgia, but the website is letthereberockga.com and then there's of course Facebook and Instagram and just try to keep up with every age level because now Facebook I guess is like for old people apparently from all the students come in. So I guess the parents are seeking that. And then Instagram and then all new things that don't even know about it. I'm trying to keep up with and learn on social media. But every platform, it's out there, so.

Jeff:
Excellent.

Kyle:
And it's cool because there's four or five across the country. My friend Scott Marceron who started it outside of Baltimore, it's in Frederick. He started the first school about 10 years ago. And then it's literally like Baltimore, Atlanta, El Paso, Southern California, like Fountain Valley and then up in outside of Philadelphia.

Kyle:
So it's kind of just scattered throughout the country run by people in music, like active musicians. It's not just someone just starting a school trying to make money on giving lessons. It's all people that are in it and have had a history in music, whether it's playing bands or managing or just know music and know the business to really give people knowledge. More than just learning how to play, but how to be in a band, how to work together and how to try and make it.

Jeff:
That's so inspiring. And that speaks a lot to the theme of this very show, which is that we're all fueled by death. And you mentioned earlier, you started this idea at a very low point when the entire world lost Vinny, it was really low. And I mean it was obviously much more for you guys in the band. And you could have turned a different corner, but you didn't and you've created something inspiring, which also speaks to who he was. I mean, I was lucky enough when you guys came around to Albany, I believe it was 2015. I actually was writing for a music magazine, New York State Music, and I got to interview Vinny before your show and he was so gracious. And he really expressed how much he was in the music community and how much he really enjoyed seeing young kids pick up drumsticks and all that kind of stuff. Can you talk a little bit about what it was like to be in a band with someone who is just amazing from my perspective?

Kyle:
I mean, it's kind of like the people you have to be around. Like the older you get, the more you go through this. You know, you try not to get jaded and it's so many things are against you. Especially like I thought it was bad when I was starting and then I was like ... I'll feel bad for bands that are starting now and then I had to start over and then it's hard for ... It's hard. It's so hard. And being with people that have had the levels of success, especially like he had, and it's still like ... He started over. Like Hellyeah just started over. He didn't start out ... Like we played some big shows and got some great tours. We played some small shows and tours that weren't that great.

Kyle:
And for him to be in there and to start back down and doing Hellyeah and like seeing him sit in some crappy dressing room. I mean, you've been to some of the best places and he'd be sitting in this crap hole and is practicing drums and just happy and loving every moment of just being happy to be out playing live, that was inspiring to me. Just being around someone that is still in it for the right reasons because you love music, not because you're trying to ... You know, he didn't need it. He didn't need to be in it for the money. He didn't need to do it for anything, but just for the love of music, and love to playing together and especially playing live and being on tour.

Kyle:
And that definitely bled over into this. Like I always think of how cool he would think this place was. Like he would just love it. Like I got the drum room in the back, it's a total Vinnie Paul room with some of his stuff that he's given me over the years and a bunch of posters and signed stuff and drum heads and fans are sending in like artwork and stuff. Everything I get Vinnie related goes in the drum room. Actually it's flooded out into the front room too. But it's just his kind of place. I just always think about how proud he would be of this place and how he would just love what's happening, what's going on here.

Jeff:
Well, I know he's a part of it and that's what's important.

Kyle:
[crosstalk 00:22:41] When we're on tour, Chaz is always saying he's definitely here with us, there's no question about it. Him and his brother are both right here and definitely believe that.

Jeff:
That's so amazing. And it's so inspiring. And again, I almost know the answer to this because like you talked about it earlier, when you're on stage, that's your release and that's your favorite. And it's 1,000% apparent. Anybody listening to this go out the next time Hellyeah is in your area and go see you guys perform. You guys are having the most fucking fun on stage. You really are.

Kyle:
It 100% is, man. That's the release. That's the [park 00:23:20] of the day. That's hour and a half that you get. Then you have to deal with the other 22 hours of the day. But for that hour and a half, it gives you enough to go and do it again the next day.

Jeff:
Of course, of course. So you know, I always talk about how like it's inevitable. You know, the finish line is death. We all know that's there, but we want to leave this world a little different before we inevitably leave it for good. And really what fuels you to keep doing what you do, to keep not only performing but to keep putting all of this positive energy into the school and everything in between? What fuels you to do it?

Kyle:
I think the downtime and actually getting kicked off your pedestal every now and then is good because I've been at home and I've just sat there and stared out the window just miserable. Like not having music in some form I'm just miserable. Hopefully you can realize that and like what are you going to do to change that. So you have to do what makes you happy. I hate people that bitch about their jobs and bitch about that, which I get it. A lot of jobs suck and you might hate it, but if you don't like something, you've got to change it. Just don't complain about it to everybody because no one wants to hear it. I don't want to hear it.

Kyle:
Just figure out what makes you happy and go do it. You know? It doesn't take a lot of money to live, but it does take money to live. So you have to do whatever you have to do to make ends meet so you can do what you want to do that makes you happy.

Jeff:
That's great.

Kyle:
Like I've been at home with [inaudible 00:24:48] and sometimes you complain about being on tour. You complain about things and then you're like take a step back, just step outside of the bubble for men. It's like well look at what are you going to do now? You going to go lay tile or something that you used to do that you hated? Or you could start do something that you didn't want to do but you did to get to where you are today. You just got to remember where you came, remember what makes you miserable, what makes you happy and then it's your choice which way you want to go.

Jeff:
That's awesome. That's awesome. And super inspiring. Finally here, I know sometimes ... You know, obviously in the industry there's things you can't talk about, but is there stuff that you can talk about coming up for Hellyeah in 2020 that we can be excited about?

Kyle:
Yeah. I mean, we're not holding anything back. Like we've said since we got back on stage that we didn't know. We did one show in Vegas, like kind of a celebration of life show. We're like well, let's see how it goes. And we said it flat out, like this might be our only show or we might do another tour or we might do another record. And we've been honest the whole way. Then we said that show was so good and fans were so receiving and thankful for us being back up there that we did a tour. And then we did a second tour and now we're about to go out again in middle of April. We're about to announce the dates. It goes out April and May, doing a lot of US festivals and then our own headline run.

Kyle:
And then, I'll be honest again, I don't know what we're going to do after that. Like the shows have been great. I mean, every show has been solid. So as far as the touring goes, it's been business as usual and everything is the way it's supposed to be. And Roy Mayorga is filling in on this entire cycle. So however long it goes, he's going to be there with us. We're talking about going overseas and there's always talk of that, but until it's solidified and you bought the tickets, then who knows if it'll happen.

Kyle:
So you were doing this April-May thing, trying to do South America and Australia, Japan and another European, UK run. But as far as on the books, it's April-May show or April-May tour. And then there's always ideas cooking. But whether we'll do another record is still up in the air. Hopefully, Hellyeah will do another one. But it's day by day, man, that's how I'm taking it. That's how you get by the next day. Instead of making a plan for a year down the road or what we're going to do or how we're going to do it because you just don't know. You just take it day by day and just work it the best you can.

Jeff:
Yeah, I think that's a great mentality. From a record standpoint though, do you guys write on the road really? Or when you were making records, was it more like attacking it in a studio and kind of writing it as it came? Or is it more of a fluid process?

Kyle:
Yeah, for the past five years, the records or the process has been after a long touring cycle, toward the end of the cycle, new ideas start coming up at sound check. There's like one little idea and then someone just record it real quick just to not forget it. So by the time you get back in the studio, you have a little bit of bed of music just to go back to and maybe one or two is cool. And actually every time something from a sound check has made it onto a record ... But a lot of it happens on the fly in the studio or with a little bit of pre-production, which has always been done at Vinnie's house. Then it's usually just Vinnie and Tom just starting and then getting some like skeleton beds and music and then building from that. So in the past, half the record has been a quick pre-pro session and half of it's been in the studio just sitting down and seeing what comes out and then building off of that.

Jeff:
That's interesting. And I think again, I think it's a great mentality that you guys have that it's not like okay, we got to retool and restart. You know, like let the chips fall where they're going to. You guys are going to still perform, still enjoy that. And who knows? Maybe at those sound checks, some ideas will come out and that'll lead you down that next journey. Who knows?

Kyle:
Right. Just whatever the natural path to take is, that's the way we want to do it. Not going to plan anything. Just whatever happens is supposed to happen and it will happen.

Jeff:
That's so great. Well, Kyle, I can't thank you enough for taking the time and talking with me on the show. Obviously, I'm going to put in all the links to your school and honestly, Hellyeah is super easy to find across all social media. But for you personally, is there any social media that you want to shout out that people can follow your journey?

Kyle:
Yeah, I mean, I'm pretty public on Instagram. It's I Remain 69 and it's through that and it's ... You know, I'm not super, super active. I am on the school, like on the school page. Anything that comes in, I'm like all over that because that's like the focus of it. But as far as everything else, I'm out there and I'm definitely easy to get in touch with, especially through the school. That's where you want to get to me right away. Do that. If you hit one of my other pages, I will get to it, it's not a priority to check my Facebook messages.

Jeff:
I understand.

Kyle:
[crosstalk 00:29:36] our school goes, man, that's what it's all about. So everything comes to me and if you get response, 90% of chance, that'll be me responding, so.

Jeff:
Well that's excellent. Congrats on a year with the school coming up. That's so amazing. Again, all those links will be in this episode. And one more time, man. Thank you so much for taking time to talk with me. I can't wait to see what's in store for Hellyeah this year.

Kyle:
Same with me, man.