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Most of our antioxidant intake could be from drinking coffee. Here's how.

Coffee packs thousands of antioxidants per cup

By Angela Garrity, Guest blogger

“Small, but mighty” correctly describes the power hidden in a few daily cups of coffee. Coffee has been found to be one of the biggest sources serving up antioxidants in the human diet that include hydrocinnamic acids and polyphenols, according to Healthline.

A hand holding roasted coffee beans

"Hydrocinnamic acids are very effective at neutralizing free radicals and preventing oxidative stress," Healthline reports, adding that polyphenols in coffee may prevent a number of conditions, such as heart disease, cancer, and type 2 diabetes.

If you’re trying to reap the antioxidant benefits from coffee, you might want to reach for a dark roast in a hot mug versus a lighter one in cold brew form, according to a study from Thomas Jefferson University.

 “Hot brewing extracts more antioxidants from the grind than cold brew, and this difference increases with the degree of roasting,” Niny Z. Rao, the project's principal investigator, explained while announcing the results through the American Chemical Society that was reported on in Food&Wine.

Hot brewed coffee seemed to have a constant level of antioxidant activity regardless of if it's light, medium, or dark-roasted — whereas the antioxidant activity in cold brew coffee was a bit lower for light roasts

Coffee has so many benefits, it is no surprise that this drink is enjoyed globally, in addition to its many day-to-day uses.

Drinking 3 to 5 cups of coffee on a daily basis can serve up to 60 percent of your daily antioxidant intake requirement, according to coffee science, so keep the grinder going and that water hot brewing — we’ve got some magic to make.

Related: Why coffee is actually good for you

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